Case Studies

Pre-Construction

Primary advantages of using an instrument such as the EM3 include non-destructive data collection, high-density sampling intervals collected at a rapid rate, delineation of landscape-level changes in physical properties of the subsurface, and identification of anomalous subsurface conditions and buried objects.

In addition, mobilization of instruments introduces opportunities for broader applications than is possible with hand-held devices. Surface surveys may be carried out rapidly, generating dense data sets useful as an initial screening tool. Geophysical data can be used on two levels. One, to identify anomalous areas and accurately target locations that warrant further investigation, remediation, and/or invasive exploration with borings (3).

Two, to delineate lateral variations in soil and rock providing “an intelligent guide to drilling.” by enabling targeted, data-based subsurface exploration.

Citations: 
  1. Rutlege, F.A., M. Mauldon, and C.J. Smith (2005) Geophysical Primer for Geotechnical Engineers. Center for Geotechnical Practice and Research at Virginia Tech, 123pp/
  2. Nazarian, S, and J. Diehl, editors (2000) Use of Geophysical Methods in Construction. Geotechnical Special Publication No. 108, Proceedings of Sessions of Geo-Denver 2000, Sponsored by the Geophysical Engineering Committee of the Geo-Institute and the American Society of Civil Engineers.
  3. Benson, R. C. (2000) An overview of geophyscial and non-destructive methods for characterization of roads and bridges. in: Use of Geophysical Methods in Construction. Geotechnical Special Publication No. 108, Proceedings of Sessions of Geo-Denver 2000, Sponsored by the Geophysical Engineering Committee of the Geo-Institute and the American Society of Civil Engineers.